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The Gottlieb Native Garden

Welcome to the Gottlieb Native Garden
Welcome to the Gottlieb Native Garden

Welcome to The Gottlieb Native Garden

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Welcome to the Gottlieb Native Garden

The Gottlieb Native Garden

Designated a “Certified Wildlife Habitat” by the National Wildlife Federation, Dan and Susan Gottlieb’s backyard is an inviting haven for cottontail rabbits, squirrels, many different species of birds, butterflies and other pollinators. For these creatures, the attraction to the Gottlieb Native Garden stems from the kinds of plants growing there: California natives such as richly scented sages, the fabulous blooms of the matilija poppy, and the California rose, rarely seen in backyard gardens and the only rose species endemic to the state. Susan conceived the Gottlieb Native Garden in 1989, and then started by removing invasive vine species in order to lure birds to her backyard. Soon, the advantages of a native plant garden became abundantly clear as the amount of water used to sustain the garden decreased and wildlife sightings increased. Susan shares her garden with the public through viewings given to college classes, garden clubs, private tours, and the annual Theodore Payne Native Plant Garden Tour. The Gottlieb Native Garden, located in Beverly Hills, has been featured in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and Real Gardens.

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Designated a “Certified Wildlife Habitat” by the National Wildlife Federation, Dan and Susan Gottlieb’s backyard is an inviting haven for cottontail rabbits, squirrels, many different species of birds, butterflies and other pollinators.

For these creatures, the attraction to the Gottlieb Native Garden stems from the kinds of plants growing there: California natives such as richly scented sages, the fabulous blooms of the matilija poppy, and the California rose, rarely seen in backyard gardens and the only rose species endemic to the state.

Susan conceived the Gottlieb Native Garden in 1989, and then started by removing invasive vine species in order to lure birds to her backyard. Soon, the advantages of a native plant garden became abundantly clear as the amount of water used to sustain the garden decreased and wildlife sightings increased.

Susan shares her garden with the public through viewings given to college classes, garden clubs, private tours, and the annual Theodore Payne Native Plant Garden Tour. The Gottlieb Native Garden, located in Beverly Hills, has been featured in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and Real Gardens.

Click on thumbnails to view stunning xRez Imaging of the Gottlieb Native Garden

Watch Garden for Wildlife

Pricing

8" x 10" — $130
11" x 14" — $150
16" x 20" — $250
20" x 30" — $300

To purchase stretched and wrapped canvas prints, please contact The G2 Gallery at 310-452-2842, or send us an email.

Visit the Gottlieb Native Garden's website:

www.GottliebNativeGarden.com

Click on thumbnails below to view The Gottlieb Native Garden

  • allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin
    Allen’s Hummingbird Selasphorus sasin
    allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin

    Allen’s Hummingbird | Selasphorus sasin

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The Hummingbird always delights. Two species, the Allen’s and the Anna’s, are both common in residential Los Angeles, with the Allen’s identified by its bright orange coloration along the sides and tail. Allen’s can be abundant at feeders and around garden plantings, particularly tubular-flowered succulents like aloe and agave.

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  • allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin
    Allen’s Hummingbird Selasphorus sasin
    allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin

    Allen’s Hummingbird | Selasphorus sasin | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The Allen’s Hummingbird nest is made with weed stems, plant fibers and down. Once it’s built, the female lays two eggs which she incubates for 15-17 days before they hatch.

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  • allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin
    Allen’s Hummingbird Selasphorus sasin on Golden Currant Ribes aureum
    allens_hummingbird_selasphorus_sasin

    Allen’s Hummingbird Selasphorus sasin on Golden Currant Ribes aureum

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    Golden Currant is a remarkably drought tolerant, deciduous plant that blooms in spring with conspicuous golden yellow flowers that often have a pronounced fragrance similar to that of cloves. This plant is great for a wildlife garden as the flowers are well liked by hummingbirds and beneficial insects, and the berries are enjoyed by many birds. The flowers and berries are also enjoyed by humans.

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  • american_robin_turdus_migratorius
    American Robin Turdus migratorius
    american_robin_turdus_migratorius

    American Robin | Turdus migratorius

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The American Robin is a migratory songbird of the Thrush family. This bird breeds throughout most of North America, has an extensive range and a large population of about 320 million individuals, and is protected throughout its range in the United States. The American Robin’s diet generally consists of earthworms, beetle grubs, caterpillars and grasshoppers, and wild and cultivated fruits and berries. It will flock to fermented Pyracantha berries and sometimes will exhibit intoxicated behavior such as falling over while walking. The Robin is frequently seen running across lawns, picking up earthworms. Its running and stopping behavior is a distinguishing characteristic.

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  • annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna
    Anna’s Hummingbird Calypte anna
    annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna

    Anna’s Hummingbird | Calypte anna

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    In its thrilling courtship displays, the male climbs up to 130 feet in the air and then swoops to the ground with a burst of noise that it produces through its tail feathers.

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  • annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna
    Anna’s Hummingbird Calypte anna
    annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna

    Anna’s Hummingbird | Calypte anna | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    This hummingbird is among the most common along the Pacific Coast and, although tiny, is medium-sized. It is mostly green and gray but the male’s head and throat are covered in iridescent reddish-pink feathers.

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  • annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna
    Anna’s Hummingbird Calypte anna
    annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna

    Anna’s Hummingbird | Calypte anna | 3

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The Anna’s Hummingbird eats nectar from feeders as well as many California native plants such as California fuchsia (Zauschneria californica), Hummingbird Sage (Salvia spathacea), native Sages, Penstemons, Honeysuckles and many others. They also eat a wide array of small insects.

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  • annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna
    Anna’s Hummingbird Calypte anna
    annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna

    Anna’s Hummingbird | Calypte anna | 4

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    This is a tiny, compact hummingbird that reaches only three to three and a half inches in length and is one of the smallest hummingbirds in North America. It has extensive rusty tones in most plumages and the male has an iridescent red throat and shiny green back.

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  • annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna
    Anna’s Hummingbird Calypte anna
    annas_hummingbird_calypte_anna

    Anna’s Hummingbird | Calypte anna | 5

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The male Anna’s Hummingbird is the only hummingbird to sing during courtship. It is also the only hummingbird to winter in northern climates.

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  • baja_fairy_duster_calliandra_californica
    Baja Fairy Duster Calliandra californica
    baja_fairy_duster_calliandra_californica

    Baja Fairy Duster | Calliandra californica

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Baja Fairy Duster is a drought and heat tolerant, small, evergreen shrub that blooms most prevalently from November to March with intermittent blooming during the summer. Following this bloom period, seeds form in pods and when the seeds are ripe, the pod explodes and disperses the seeds. Wildlife Value: Hummingbirds and bees visit Fairy Duster flowers constantly. Marine Blue butterflies are known to visit this plant. The seeds are eaten by small birds and mammals.

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  • band_tailed_pigeon_columba_fasciata
    Band-tailed Pigeon Columba fasciata
    band_tailed_pigeon_columba_fasciata

    Band-tailed Pigeon | Columba fasciata

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    This large, fast-flying, handsome pigeon is a native of North America and should not be confused with its distant relative, the common pigeon (rock dove), imported from Europe and seen around farms, cities and parks. A variety of factors have reduced the total population of this bird to a fraction of what it was just a few decades ago. The Band-tailed Pigeon is known to be monogamous, at least throughout an individual nesting season with both sexes sharing in incubation and rearing of the squabs (nestlings). It often visits bird feeders and is one of the birds that enjoy dining on the berries of the Toyon tree Heteromeles arbutifolia.

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  • bladderpod_isomeris_arborea
    Bladderpod Isomeris arborea
    bladderpod_isomeris_arborea

    Bladderpod | Isomeris arborea

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Bladderpod is a very drought tolerant, evergreen shrub that produces abundant clusters of bright yellow flowers almost year round and is adaptable to harsh conditions. The fruit is an inflated pod, usually oval in shape, smooth and green when new, aging to light brown. As the fruit ages, the seeds within can be heard rattling around. Eventually the pod bursts open and the seeds inside disperse.

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    Black-headed Grosbeak Pheucticus melanocephalus
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    Black-headed Grosbeak | Pheucticus melanocephalus

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    This songbird is a medium sized, seed eating, migratory bird with nesting grounds from southwestern British Columbia through the western half of the United States, into central Mexico. Both male and female incubate their eggs and feed the young. The Black-headed Grosbeak eats pine and other seeds, berries and fruit, and spiders and insects. During the summer months it mostly eats spiders, snails and insects. It is one of the few birds that can safely eat the poisonous monarch butterfly.

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  • bobcat_felis_rufus
    Bobcat Felis rufus
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    Bobcat | Felis rufus

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    A shy but surprisingly common carnivore in the hills surrounding Los Angeles, this individual was captured coming in for a late afternoon drink. Bobcats gravitate towards backyards with large areas of open space. These often include several wide ranging animals including mule deer and California quail.

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  • california_ground_squirrel_otospermophilus_beecheyi
    California Ground Squirrel Otospermophilus beecheyi
    california_ground_squirrel_otospermophilus_beecheyi

    California Ground Squirrel | Otospermophilus beecheyi

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The California Ground Squirrel is common and easily observed. This squirrel prefers open, well drained habitat where it can live in burrows which it excavates for itself. Some burrows are occupied communally but each individual squirrel has its own entrance. California Ground Squirrels are near the bottom of the food chain and are preyed upon by rattlesnakes, eagles, badgers, foxes and weasels. They have developed some very creative techniques to reduce rattlesnake predation. Their litters vary in size according to the climate in which they are located. In warmer zones litters are larger and in southern California they average 8.4 young per litter.

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  • california_wild_rose_rosa_californica
    California Wild Rose Rosa californica
    california_wild_rose_rosa_californica

    California Wild Rose | Rosa californica

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Though our region is famous for its roses, from the Tournament of Roses in Pasadena to the many rose gardens at our museums and botanical gardens, only one species is native, and it is rarely seen growing in yards. Typically found around springs in the foothills and mountains, Wild Rose lacks the giant, multi-colored flowers of English Roses, but is beautiful with its delicate pale pink color and mass of yellow stamens. Native bees (the sting-less varieties) frequent the Wild Rose when in bloom, and birds use the tangled, thorny stems for cover. The rose hips provide food for wildlife and, yes, you can make a cup of tea from them!

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  • carpenter_bees_mating_xylocopa
    Two Carpenter Bees Mating Xylocopa on Cleveland Sage Salvia clevelandii
    carpenter_bees_mating_xylocopa

    Two Carpenter Bees Mating Xylocopa on Cleveland Sage Salvia clevelandii

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Carpenter Bee gets its name from the fact that nearly all species build their nests in burrows in dead wood, bamboo or structural timbers. A few species bore holes in wood dwellings, but since the tunnels are near the surface, structural damage is generally minor or nonexistent. It does not eat wood. The Carpenter Bee can be an important pollinator on open-faced flowers, even an obligate pollinator on some, though many species are known to “rob” nectar by slitting the sides of flowers with deep corollas. Male bees are harmless as they do not have a stinger. Females are capable of stinging, but are docile and sting only if provoked.

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  • catalina_cherry_prunus_lyonii
    Catalina Cherry Prunus lyonii
    catalina_cherry_prunus_lyonii

    Catalina Cherry | Prunus lyonii

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Catalina Cherry is a showy, drought-tolerant, pest-free evergreen shrub that is one of the best looking, least demanding trees one can grow in this climate. It is easy to grow from seed, has long been cultivated as a food source and tolerates pruning for use as a hedge.It produces clusters of small white flowers followed by black, edible cherries. The cherries, however, are all skin and seed - not meaty enough for most humans. Native Americans fermented the fruit into a drink used to get intoxicated. Wildlife Value: Bees and other beneficial insects are attracted to the white flowers. Caterpillars of the Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon) butterfly feed on this plant. Birds like the cherries and seeds so much it is hard to find seeds from this tree.

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  • chalk_dudleya_dudleya_brittonii
    Chalk Dudleya Dudleya brittonii
    chalk_dudleya_dudleya_brittonii

    Chalk Dudleya | Dudleya brittonii

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This is a spectacular succulent with leaves that grow more than one foot wide. The leaves are covered with a dusty, chalky, mealy white “wax.” The wax coats the drops of water on the leaves preventing the water from evaporating. The wax has the highest measured ultraviolet reflectivity of any plant. When it flowers, one to two foot arching spikes grow out of the thick basal stem. The stem blushes red as the clusters of yellow flowers begin to open in late spring and early summer. When planting, tilt to one side so the rainwater does not collect in the middle.

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  • cleveland_sage_salvia_clevelandii
    Cleveland Sage Salvia Clevelandii
    cleveland_sage_salvia_clevelandii

    Cleveland Sage | Salvia Clevelandii

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Also known as Fragrant Sage, Cleveland Sage is a drought- tolerant, perennial shrub that is native to California. A dramatic shrub, it produces beautiful flower heads in late April, that last five or six weeks. Wildlife Value: The flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds, butterflies and other insects, the seeds provide food for seed- eating birds, and the foliage provides cover for birds and other wildlife.

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  • common_raven_corvus_corax
    Common Raven Corvus corax
    common_raven_corvus_corax

    Common Raven | Corvus corax

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    This confident, inquisitive bird is considered among the smartest of all birds with some remarkable feats of problem solving having been observed. In many indigenous cultures, the Common Raven has been revered as a spiritual figure or god. This big, sooty-colored bird is not just large, but massive, with a thick neck, shaggy throat feathers and a heavy, sharp beak. In flight, the raven has a long wedge-shaped tail. It is entirely black, including the legs, eyes and beak and has a wingspan of 40 to 60 inches. The raven is not as social as the crow and tends to be seen alone or in pairs. It mates for life, with each pair defending a territory. The Common Raven has co-existed with humans for thousands of years and in some areas has been so numerous as to be considered a pest. Part of its success comes from its omnivorous diet. It feeds on carrion, insects, cereal grains, berries, fruit, small animals and food waste.

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  • coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii
    Cooper’s Hawk Accipiter cooperii
    coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii

    Cooper’s Hawk | Accipiter cooperii

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    A medium-sized hawk with broad, rounded wings and a very long tail, it is among the bird world’s most skillful fliers. The Cooper’s Hawk is a forest and woodland bird, but these hawks are a regular sight in city parks, quiet neighborhoods, at backyard feeders and even along busy streets with trees.

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  • coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii
    Cooper’s Hawk Accipiter cooperii
    coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii

    Cooper’s Hawk | Accipiter cooperii | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The Cooper’s Hawk eats medium-sized birds as its main diet but it also will eat chipmunks, hares, squirrels and bats.

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  • coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii
    Cooper’s Hawk Accipiter cooperii
    coopers_hawk_accipiter_cooperii

    Cooper’s Hawk | Accipiter cooperii | 3

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    Cooper’s Hawk population trends are strong today. That is a turnaround from mid-twentieth century when use of DDT and widespread shootings greatly reduced its numbers.

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    Crab Spider Misumena vatia on Desert Marigold Baileya multiradiata
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    Crab Spider Misumena vatia on Desert Marigold Baileya multiradiata

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This spider may be yellow or white depending on the flower in which it is hunting. It changes color by secreting a liquid yellow pigment into the outer cell layer of the body. The female is often found hunting prey in Goldenrod, as the bright yellow flowers attract large numbers of insects which are needed by the female to produce a healthy clutch of eggs. The much smaller male scampers from flower to flower in search of a female, and is often seen missing one or more of its legs. The Desert Marigold is one of the most conspicuous spring wildflowers across the arid lands of the southwest. It begins to flower in March and continues to bloom off and on until November. Its beauty, drought tolerance and long flowering season has made the Desert Marigold a popular plant in the horticultural world.

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  • familiar_bluet_enallagma_civile
    Familiar Bluet Enallagma civile
    familiar_bluet_enallagma_civile

    Familiar Bluet | Enallagma civile

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    As pictured here, the Familiar Bluet is a classic damselfly, tiny and thin, with bright blue and black bands. It is extremely adaptable to the urban environment but if you see one, it is often an indication of a constructed habitat such as a storm drain, a backyard pond or an artificial wetland. This beautiful insect is active every month of the year.

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    Familiar Bluet Enallagma civile
    familiar_bluet_enallagma_civile

    Familiar Bluet | Enallagma civile 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Familiar Bluet damselfly is native to much of the United States and southern Canada. Growing in a sandy habitat, the sand dune sedge looks a lot like grass. It has triangular stems that grow up to sixteen inches tall with clusters of dark brownish flowers along the stalk.

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  • flame_skimmer_libellula_saturata
    Flame Skimmer Libellula saturata
    flame_skimmer_libellula_saturata

    Flame Skimmer | Libellula saturata

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    One of the most striking, and the most common large dragonfly in Los Angeles, the Flame Skimmer is often found near water, even small backyard fountains. Females are dull, appearing beige, but often accompany the bright males.

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  • flame_skimmer_libellula_saturata
    Flame Skimmer Libellula saturata
    flame_skimmer_libellula_saturata

    Flame Skimmer | Libellula saturata | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Flame Skimmer is usually the first dragonfly to appear in a garden water feature, and even a leaky spigot can attract a curious individual. Its prey - other even smaller flying insects - is typically taken on the wing.

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  • foothill_penstemon_penstemon_heterophyllus
    Foothill Penstemon Penstemon heterophyllus
    foothill_penstemon_penstemon_heterophyllus

    Foothill Penstemon | Penstemon heterophyllus

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    A spectacular group of native plants, the Foothill Penstemon has lots of bright flowers usually arranged in whorls running up the stem. This species is commonly found in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains along the north side of the L.A. Basin, and locally in the Santa Monica Mountains (mainly toward the western end). Hummingbirds can flock to these plants, especially during fall migration, which starts in July, and cultivars of native forms can bloom nearly year-round given the right conditions.

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  • fragrant_pitcher_sage_lepechinia_fragrans
    Fragrant Pitcher Sage Lepechinia fragrans
    fragrant_pitcher_sage_lepechinia_fragrans

    Fragrant Pitcher Sage | Lepechinia fragrans

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This plant works well in a garden setting. It is endemic to California and is threatened by development and by fire management. It is listed by the California Native Plant Society as a plant that is fairly endangered and should be watched. The leaves have a wonderful intense fragrance reminiscent of the chaparral plant community. The beautiful, showy pitcher-shaped flowers range in color from white to pale pink to medium purple and are attractive to hummingbirds. The fruit forms in clusters of four smooth shiny, dark brown nutlets.

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  • garden_view_hummingbird
    Garden View (hummingbirds feeding)
    garden_view_hummingbird

    Garden View (hummingbirds feeding)

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    Can you count the hummingbirds?

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  • garden_view_hummingbird_circled
    Garden View (hummingbirds circled)
    garden_view_hummingbird_circled

    Garden View (hummingbirds circled)

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    There are ten hummingbirds feeding at these feeders.

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  • garden_view
    Garden View
    garden_view

    Garden View

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    In this image you can find native plants including: Indian Mallow Abutilon palmeri, Bigleaf Lupine Lupinus polyphyllus, & California Sagebrush Artemisia californica

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    Garden View
    garden_view

    Garden View 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    In this image you can find native plants including: Hummingbird Sage/Pitcher Sage Salvia spathacea, Hooker’s Evening Primrose Oenothera hookeri, California Buckwheat Eriogonum fasciculatum, Dwarf Coyote Brush Baccharis pilularis, ‘Pigeon Point,’ as well as non-native species: Loquat Tree Eriobotrya japonica Bottle Brush & Callistemon

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  • grasshopper_orthoptera
    Grasshopper Orthoptera on Black Sage Salvia mellifera
    grasshopper_orthoptera

    Grasshopper Orthoptera on Black Sage Salvia mellifera

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    There are thousands of valid species of this leaping insect described to date with many still un-described species existing. The coloring of different species of grasshopper is often dependent on the environment. Many green species are adapted to green fields and forests and blend in to avoid predators. Others have adapted to drier, sandy environments and blend in well with the colors of dry dirt and sand. The Grasshopper has positive and negative effects on the ecosystem. As an herbivore, it joins plants to the rest of the ecosystem and its droppings contribute to nutrient turnover by returning nutrients as fertilizer for plants. It provides food for birds and other arthropods. On the negative side, some species of grasshopper can cause serious crop damage and loss of plants in pastures. In certain countries, grasshoppers are eaten as a good source of protein, minerals and vitamins. They are eaten raw, boiled, sun-dried, fried, flavored with spices, such as garlic, onions, chile, drenched in lime and used in soup or as a filling dish.

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  • great_horned_owl_bubo_viginianus
    Great Horned Owl Bubo viginianus
    great_horned_owl_bubo_viginianus

    Great Horned Owl | Bubo viginianus

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The Great Horned Owl was first seen in the Virginia colonies so its species name was created from the Latinized form of the territory name. This owl is the most common of the Americas and lives from the Arctic to South America. The name, Great Horned Owl, is derived from tufts of feathers that appear to be “horns” which are sometime referred to as “ear tufts” but have nothing to do with hearing. This is a large owl with an impressive repertoire of sounds, ranging from deep booming hoots to shrill shrieks. Owls have spectacular binocular vision allowing them to pinpoint prey and see in low light. And their hearing is as good if not better than their eyesight. The Great Horned Owl preys on a large variety of creatures including raccoons, rabbits, squirrels, birds and other owls. It regularly eats skunks and is even known to consume porcupines.

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  • gulf_fritillary_agraulis_vanillae
    Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae on Coyote Mint Monardella odoratissima
    gulf_fritillary_agraulis_vanillae

    Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae on Coyote Mint Monardella odoratissima

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This large butterfly is sometimes confused with the similarly colored Monarch, but it’s about half the size and has only thin black veins on the wings. It is closely tied to the non-native Passion Vine, which produces passion fruit, and consequently is very common in urban southern California, and around the Americas -- especially where this vine has been planted. Historically, it would not have been present in the U.S., but the popularity of Passion Vine in landscaping has enabled its remarkable range expansion. Unlike most species of North American butterflies, which are mainly active in spring and summer, this species flies year-round.

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  • harlequin_bug_murgantia_histrionica
    Harlequin Bug Murgantia histrionica on Bladderpod Isomeris arborea
    harlequin_bug_murgantia_histrionica

    Harlequin Bug Murgantia histrionica on Bladderpod Isomeris arborea

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This beautiful bug is native to Central America and Mexico but is now found from coast to coast in North America as far north as the Great Lakes and New England. The Harlequin Bug is an important insect pest of cabbage and related crops such as broccoli, radishes, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, collards and many other vegetables. Wildlife Value: The flowers on this long-blooming plant provide nectar and pollen for hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. The seeds provide food for seed-eating birds and other wildlife.

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  • hooded_oriole_(male)_icterus_cucullatus
    Hooded Oriole (male) Icterus cucullatus
    hooded_oriole_(male)_icterus_cucullatus

    Hooded Oriole (male) | Icterus cucullatus

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Hooded Oriole is a beautiful summer visitor to Southern California where it breeds, nesting almost exclusively in the native California Fan Palm (Washingtonia filifera). Palm fibers are the essential building material for their intricately woven nests, which hang like hammocks from the underside of the palm fronds. This bird eats mainly insects except in the summer when it will also feed on fruits and flower nectar. It does not hesitate to come to Oriole feeders filled with sugar water, and is known to enjoy grape jelly, bananas, cooked raisins and mealworms.

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  • house_finch_carpodacus_mexicanus
    House Finch Male and Female Carpodacus mexicanus
    house_finch_carpodacus_mexicanus

    House Finch Male and Female | Carpodacus mexicanus

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    Originally from Mexico and southwestern United States, the House Finch can now be found throughout North America. It was sold illegally as the “Hollywood Finch” in New York City, and was released into the area where it became naturalized.

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  • house_finch_carpodacus_mexicanus
    House Finch Male and Female Carpodacus mexicanus
    house_finch_carpodacus_mexicanus

    House Finch Male and Female | Carpodacus mexicanus | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    The adult male House Finch has a reddish head, neck and shoulders while the adult female has a brown head, neck and shoulders.

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  • hummingbird_sage_salvia_spathacea
    Hummingbird Sage Salvia spathacea
    hummingbird_sage_salvia_spathacea

    Hummingbird Sage Salvia spathacea

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Hummingbird Sage is an evergreen perennial that is a natural component of the Oak Woodland. It has evolved to do well in shady areas without a lot of moisture and is one of the few plants that can grow well under oak trees. The bright green leaves are highly aromatic and the blooms are long lasting. The flowers vary in color from green to light pink and magenta to purple.

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  • leopord_lily_california_tiger_lily_lilium_pardalinum
    Leopard Lily / California Tiger Lily Lilium pardalinum
    leopord_lily_california_tiger_lily_lilium_pardalinum

    Leopard Lily / California Tiger Lily | Lilium pardalinum

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    When in its natural habitat this lily occurs almost always in stream banks and wetlands. In the garden setting, it needs a moist area in shade/part shade. It can also be grown in a pot. The sturdy stems can reach three feet in height and the flowers can be three inches across. This is a deciduous bulb that blooms from May to July. The root of this plant is edible and can be cooked in a way similar to potatoes. Wildlife Value: Hummingbirds love this plant. It is pollinated by bees and butterflies visiting it for the nectar.

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  • lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria
    Lesser Goldfinch Carduelis psaltria
    lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria

    Lesser Goldfinch | Carduelis psaltria

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Lesser Goldfinch is a tiny, gregarious, seed-eating bird of the Southwest. This songbird is particularly adaptable when it comes to habitats and frequents thickets, weedy fields, woodlands, forest clearings, scrublands, farmlands and even desert oases.

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  • lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria_2
    Lesser Goldfinch Carduelis psaltria
    lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria_2

    Lesser Goldfinch | Carduelis psaltria | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    This finch will form flocks and forage together eating seeds, buds, flowers and fruit, and will occasionally supplement its diet with insects. Water sites can attract large congregations.

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  • lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria_2
    Lesser Goldfinch Carduelis psaltria
    lesser_goldfinch_carduelis_psaltria_2

    Lesser Goldfinch | Carduelis psaltria | 3

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    Lesser Goldfinch pairs are monogamous and the male feeds the female while she is incubating eggs.

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  • matilija_poppy_bud_romneya_coulteri
    Matilija Poppy Bud Romneya coulteri
    matilija_poppy_bud_romneya_coulteri

    Matilija Poppy Bud | Romneya coulteri

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Matilija poppies spread by rhizomes and are ideal hillside plants for erosion control. These wondrous plants bloom in late spring/early summer and go dormant in winter.

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  • matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri
    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri & Bees
    matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri

    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri & Bees

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This spectacular California native is frequently used to accent xeriscape gardens around the West. Its massive white and yellow flowers set off stonework and more modest shrubbery. A favorite of bees and many native pollinators, it is easy to grow and maintain, and requires little water or care. Two similar species occur in southern California, one is becoming common to the north toward Santa Barbara, the second one is rare and can be found in the backcountry of San Diego County.

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  • matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri
    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri
    matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri

    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    A perennial/shrub that can grow to eight feet in height and, if it’s happy where it is, consume your whole yard -- and your neighbors as well! The flower measures between four and twelve inches across and consists of white, crepe-like petals and a central cluster of bright- yellow stamens. Wildlife Value: It is a magnet for native bees and honeybees.

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  • matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri
    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri
    matilija_poppy_romneya_coulteri

    Matilija Poppy Romneya coulteri

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Matilija poppy is native strictly to a small section of Southern and Baja California. As Emily Green, writer/blogger, www. chanceofrain.com says, "One would think that the Matilija would be treated as a local treasure, but most Southern California gardeners seem indifferent."

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  • mills_glory_holly_leaved_california_lilac_ceanothus_cultivar
    Mills Glory Holly Leaved California Lilac Ceanothus cultivar
    mills_glory_holly_leaved_california_lilac_ceanothus_cultivar

    Mills Glory Holly Leaved California Lilac | Ceanothus cultivar

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This hybrid lilac is a drought tolerant, evergreen ground cover with denim blue flowers and dark green, glossy foliage. This plant can be used in large-scale ground cover projects in deer areas since deer do not seem to like it much. As with other ceanothus species, Mills Glory provides nectar, pollen and berries for wildlife.

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  • monarch_caterpillar_danaus_plexippus
    Monarch Caterpillar Danaus plexippus on Hedge Nettle Stachys bullata
    monarch_caterpillar_danaus_plexippus

    Monarch Caterpillar Danaus plexippus on Hedge Nettle Stachys bullata

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Monarch Caterpillar is born from an egg, pupates into a chrysalis then makes its transition into a Monarch Butterfly. The Monarch spends the larval stage of its life eating – and growing. The typical monarch caterpillar increases in mass by 2,000 times before becoming a butterfly. It eats only milkweed (although recent lab experiments have shown that it will eat pumpkin and cucumber). When frightened, the caterpillar uses a silk lifeline to escape quickly. They can drop to the ground and vanish in the vegetation in an instant. The half inch pink flower blooms from April through November. Early Californians used poultices of heated leaves for earaches and infected sores. They also used concoctions of roots as a gargle for sore throats and orally for stomach aches. Wildlife Value: It is great for butterfly gardens since adult butterflies sip on the nectar. Hummingbirds also like the nectar.

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  • mourning_dove_zenaida_macroura
    Mourning Dove Zenaida macroura
    mourning_dove_zenaida_macroura

    Mourning Dove | Zenaida macroura

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    This bird is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American birds. It is also the leading game bird with more than 20 million (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S. both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain itself under such pressure stems from its prolific breeding: in warm areas, one pair may raise six broods a year. The Mourning Dove eats almost exclusively seeds. Rarely it will eat snails or insects.

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  • pacific_tree_frog_pseudacris_regilla
    Pacific Tree Frog Pseudacris regilla
    pacific_tree_frog_pseudacris_regilla

    Pacific Tree Frog | Pseudacris regilla

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Pacific Tree Frog has a range from the west coast of the United States to British Columbia. It lives from sea level to more than 10,000 feet in many types of habitats, reproducing in aquatic settings. The Pacific Tree Frog comes in shades of greens or browns and can change colors over periods of hours and weeks.

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  • pacific_tree_frog_pseudacris_regilla
    Pacific Tree Frog Pseudacris regilla
    pacific_tree_frog_pseudacris_regilla

    Pacific Tree Frog | Pseudacris regilla | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Growing to only two inches long, the Pacific Tree Frog is small and difficult to see but very easy to hear as its calls are much louder than its tiny size would seem to produce. Much of its diet consists of spiders, beetles, flies, other insects and arthropods; it can and does eat insects that are almost as large as it is, and will expand its body slightly to accommodate these meals. Predators include snakes, raccoons, herons, egrets and other small mammals and reptiles.

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  • pale_swallowtale_papilio_eurymedon
    Pale Swallowtail Papilio eurymedon on Coyote Mint Monardella odoratissima
    pale_swallowtale_papilio_eurymedon

    Pale Swallowtail Papilio eurymedon on Coyote Mint Monardella odoratissima

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    In our area, the Pale Swallowtail may visit native plant gardens in the Santa Monica Mountains and the foothill communities, where it feeds on the nectar of a wide variety of plants. Particularly in late summer, dozens of these butterflies may be seen “hill- topping” - crowding around exposed peaks in local mountains. This behavior appears to serve a socio-biological function for a variety of butterflies and other invertebrates.

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  • phainopepla_phainopepla_nitens
    Phainopepla Phainopepla nitens
    phainopepla_phainopepla_nitens

    Phainopepla | Phainopepla nitens

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The Phainopepla is a striking, slender bird with a noticeable crest and long tail. The male is glossy black and the female is plain gray. Both sexes have red eyes, but these are more noticeable in the female than the male. Berries, any small insects, fruits, and vegetables comprise the diet of this species. Phainopeplas have been found to imitate the calls of twelve other species such as the Red-tailed Hawk and the Northern Flicker.

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  • praying_mantis_mantis_religiosa
    Praying Mantis Mantis religiosa
    praying_mantis_mantis_religiosa

    Praying Mantis Mantis religiosa

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The Praying Mantis is named for its prominent front legs, which are bent and held together at an angle that suggests the position of prayer. It has a triangular head that can rotate 180 degrees to scan its surroundings. A formidable predator, the mantis lies in ambush or patiently stalks its prey. Its front legs, with which it snares its quarry, is equipped with spikes for trapping prey and pinning it in place. Moths, crickets, grasshoppers and other insects, including other mantis, are the diet of the Praying Mantis. The adult female will sometimes eat her mate just after, or even during, mating. Females regularly lay hundreds of eggs in a small case and when the nymphs hatch they look like tiny versions of their parents.

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  • red_buckwheat_eriogonum_grande_var
    Red Buckwheat Eriogonum grande var. rubescens
    red_buckwheat_eriogonum_grande_var

    Red Buckwheat | Eriogonum grande var. rubescens

    Pigment print on canvas | 20" x 30" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This rare, showy buckwheat is evergreen, drought tolerant, long blooming and easy to grow from seed. It is a native of the Channel Islands but does fine in the interior. Wildlife Value: Butterflies like the nectar, and the flowers, leaves and seeds are used by many of the smaller mammals. Birds such as finches, juncos, larks, sparrows, towhees, quail and grouse also use parts of this plant.

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  • sacred_datura_jimsonweed_datura_wrightii
    Sacred Datura / Jimsonweed Datura wrightii
    sacred_datura_jimsonweed_datura_wrightii

    Sacred Datura / Jimsonweed | Datura wrightii

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Sacred Datura is a drought tolerant, rambling, shrub-like, herbaceous perennial, all parts of which are toxic and may be fatal if ingested by humans or other animals. The large, sweetly scented, trumpet-shaped flower is white, often tinted with pale lavender especially on the margins. It usually opens in late afternoon/evening and closes soon after daylight the next day. While open it is visited by its pollinator, the Sphinx Moth, who is attracted by the sweet nectar contained within the flower.

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  • sandhill_sagebrush_artemisia_pycnocephala
    Sandhill Sagebrush Artemisia pycnocephala
    sandhill_sagebrush_artemisia_pycnocephala

    Sandhill Sagebrush | Artemisia pycnocephala

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This drought tolerant Artemisia forms a neat low mound of beautiful, silver filigree foliage only a foot tall and three feet wide. People that like grey foliage love this plant for color contrast in their garden design. The yellow flowers are inconspicuous but people buy this plant for its foliage not its flowers. The foliage is fragrant and deer resistant.

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  • sand_dune_sedge_carex_pansa
    Sand Dune Sedge Carex pansa
    sand_dune_sedge_carex_pansa

    Sand Dune Sedge | Carex pansa

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Dan Gottlieb

    Dune Sedge is a native, meadow-forming sedge that is growing in popularity as a lawn substitute. It is a carefree, relatively flat native that will withstand occasional foot traffic and uses considerably less resources than the typical California lawn.

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  • soap_plant_chlorogalum_pomeridianum
    Soap Plant Chlorogalum pomeridianum
    soap_plant_chlorogalum_pomeridianum

    Soap Plant | Chlorogalum pomeridianum

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Lilies tend to be scarce in our arid environment in southern California, so the occasional patch of Soap Plant, or Soap Lily, always catches the eye of local botanists. Though the flowers on this species are relatively small and dull white, the plant itself can be huge - taller than six feet - and the blooms can seem to float in the air on spindly stalks. Hard clay soils, lamented by most gardeners, are ideal for the Soap Plant and most of our lilies, and like most conspicuous native plants, this one was heavily used by Native Americans and early settlers. The juices produced in the bulbs were pressed out to soap-up during bath time, or were dropped into pools along streams to stun fish and make them easy to catch.

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  • townsends_warbler_dendroica_townsendi
    Townsend’s Warbler Dendroica townsendi
    townsends_warbler_dendroica_townsendi

    Townsend’s Warbler | Dendroica townsendi

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    A bird of the Pacific Northwest, the Townsend’s Warbler nests in coniferous forests from Alaska to Oregon. It winters in two distinct areas: in a narrow strip along the Pacific Coast, and in Mexico and Central America. It is during winter months that it is observed in the Los Angeles area. On the wintering grounds in Mexico, the Townsend’s Warbler feeds extensively on the sugary excretions of scale insects. It will defend territories around trees infected with these honey-dew producing insects against other Townsend’s Warbler’s as well as other bird species. When preparing to nest, sometimes the female Townsend’s Warbler will partially construct a nest in one tree, then move all the materials to another tree and finish the nest there - the avian version of a woman’s prerogative to change her mind.

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  • toyon_heteromeles_arbutifolia
    Toyon Heteromeles arbutifolia
    toyon_heteromeles_arbutifolia

    Toyon | Heteromeles arbutifolia

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Toyon is a drought tolerant, evergreen shrub, or multi-stemmed small tree, that produces small white flowers in summer, and small, showy bright red berry-like fruit in the fall and winter. It makes a good hedge or specimen plant. In the 1920’s, collecting Toyon branches for Christmas became so popular in Los Angeles that the State of California passed a law making it illegal to do so on public land. Toyon berries provided food for local Native American tribes and the leaves were made into a tea and used as a stomach remedy. Most berries were dried and stored and later cooked into porridge or pancakes. Later, sugar was added to make custard and wine. Wildlife Value: During the flowering phase Toyon is visited by butterflies and bees. The berries are consumed by birds, including mockingbirds, American Robins and Cedar Waxwings. Mammals, including coyotes and bears, eat and disperse the berries.

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  • western_bluebird_sialia_mexicana
    Western Bluebird Sialia mexicana
    western_bluebird_sialia_mexicana

    Western Bluebird | Sialia mexicana

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The Western Bluebird can be distinguished by its throat. The male has a bright blue head and throat with orange sides and breast, grey belly and brownish patch on its back. The female has a duller blue body, tail and wings orange sides and breast and a grey throat.

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  • western_columbine_aquilegia_formosa
    Western Columbine Aquilegia formosa
    western_columbine_aquilegia_formosa

    Western Columbine | Aquilegia formosa

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Western Columbine is an attractive and common wildflower native to western North America, equally likely to occur in wetlands or non wetlands. Native Americans used this perennial for many different purposes. Some thought the plant was a good luck charm, others ate it as a vegetable. Still others treated the flower like candy, sucking out the sweet nectar from the spurs. Medicinally, the plant was used as an analgesic and anti rheumatic and the leaves were chewed for coughs and sore throats. The list goes on. In addition to all its other uses, the Columbine was considered a love medicine plant; women used it as a charm to gain men’s affection. Wildlife Value: It is a good nectar source for hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Other birds, such as finches and sparrows, eat the seeds. The Sphinx Moth is a prime pollinator of the Columbine.

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  • western_fence_lizard_sceloporus_occidentalis
    Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis
    western_fence_lizard_sceloporus_occidentalis

    Western Fence Lizard | Sceloporus occidentalis

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    Commonly found all over California, the Western Fence Lizard can be seen sunbathing on rocks, paths and even fence poles. Areas with a Western Fence Lizard population tend to have low rates of Lyme disease; when a tick feeds on it, a protein in the lizard’s blood kills the bacteria in the tick that causes Lyme disease cleansing the tick’s blood.

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  • western_scrub_jay_aphelocoma_californica
    Western Scrub Jay Aphelocoma californica
    western_scrub_jay_aphelocoma_californica

    Western Scrub Jay | Aphelocoma californica

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The Western Scrub Jay is a species of Scrub Jay that is native to western North America. Recent research has suggested that the Western Scrub Jay, along with several other Corvids (ravens, crows) is among the most intelligent of animals. The brain-to-body-mass ratio of the adult Scrub Jay rivals that of chimpanzee and cetacean, and is dwarfed only by a human. It is the only non-primate shown to plan ahead for the future. Other studies have shown that it can remember locations of over 200 food caches, as well as the food item in each cache and its rate of decay. Populations are being adversely affected by the West Nile virus.

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  • western_tanager_piranga_ludoviciana
    Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana
    western_tanager_piranga_ludoviciana

    Western Tanager | Piranga ludoviciana

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This beautiful, black, yellow and red bird visits our yard every year in springtime while migrating north from its wintering grounds in Central America. Despite its striking markings the Western Tanager is a surprisingly inconspicuous bird. It breeds as far north as the Northwest Territories, farther than any other member of its mostly tropical family.

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  • western_tanager_piranga_ludoviciana
    Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana
    western_tanager_piranga_ludoviciana

    Western Tanager | Piranga ludoviciana | 2

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by the Gottlieb Bird Cam

    The red pigment in the face of the Western Tanager is rhodoxanthin, a pigment rare in birds. It is not manufactured by the bird, as are the pigments used by the other red tanagers. Instead, it must be acquired from the diet, presumably from insects that themselves acquire the pigment from plants.

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  • white_crowned_sparrow_zonotrichia_leucophrys
    White-crowned Sparrow Zonotrichia leucophrys on Coast Sunflower / Bush Sunflower Encelia californica
    white_crowned_sparrow_zonotrichia_leucophrys

    White-crowned Sparrow Zonotrichia leucophrys on Coast Sunflower / Bush Sunflower Encelia californica

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    A drought tolerant native of Southern California and Baja California, the Coast Sunflower is easy to grow and looks lovely when mixed with sages and lilacs. This is a great habitat plant and is often used for hill stabilization. Wildlife Value: Attractive to many pollinating insects, especially butterflies and native bees. The seeds and flowers provide food for small birds and mammals. Whoever says L.A. doesn’t have seasons has never met the White-crowned Sparrow. Around the third week of September, a new sweet song is heard from backyard shrubs across the city announcing that this beautiful little bird has traveled about 2600 miles from Alaska to spend the winter in Southern California. This sparrow is known for its natural alertness mechanism, which allows it to stay awake for up to two weeks while migrating. Because of its dashing look – bold black and white striped head, pale beak and crisp gray breast – this is one of the easiest sparrows to identify.

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  • white_sage_salvia_apiana
    White Sage Salvia apiana
    white_sage_salvia_apiana

    White Sage | Salvia apiana

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    White Sage is a dramatic, drought tolerant, evergreen shrub with whitish leaves that contain resins and oils that release a strong fragrance when rubbed. The small, beautiful flower emerges in the summer on two to five inch long stems and is white with a little lavender. White Sage was widely used by Native American groups for food, tea and medicine. The leaves were, and still are, burned in sweat lodges by many tribes, with the smoke used in different purification rituals. Today, this sage is used in burn sticks and sold in trendy shops. Unfortunately, in order to produce these burn sticks, large amounts of the plants have been removed from the wild. Wildlife Value: Bumble bees, hawk moths and wasps pollinate White Sage. It is great in a bird garden as hummingbirds come to the flowers for the nectar and seeds are eaten by birds and other wildlife.

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  • white_lined_sphinx_moth_hyles_lineata
    White-lined Sphinx Moth Hyles lineata
    white_lined_sphinx_moth_hyles_lineata

    White-lined Sphinx Moth | Hyles lineata

    Pigment print on canvas | 8" x 10" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This moth is called the Sphinx Moth because of its size, its ability to hover at food sources and its swift flight patterns. For these reasons, the Sphinx Moth requires large amounts of food to sustain itself. It feeds exclusively on nectar and seeks flowers with high sugar and water content. Such is the case with the Evening Primrose Family and particularly the Dune Evening Primrose, which the White-lined Sphinx Moth is responsible for pollinating. Note: This moth does not eat your clothes!

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  • xRez Imaging of the Gottlieb Native Garden
    xRez Imaging of the Gottlieb Native Garden
    xRez Imaging of the Gottlieb Native Garden

    xRez Imaging of the Gottlieb Native Garden

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  • yellow_faced_bumble_bee_bombus_vosenesenskii
    Yellow-faced Bumble Bee (male) Bombus vosnesenskii on Cleveland Sage Salvia clevelandii
    yellow_faced_bumble_bee_bombus_vosenesenskii

    Yellow-faced Bumble Bee (male) Bombus vosnesenskii on Cleveland Sage Salvia clevelandii

    Pigment print on canvas | 11" x 14" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    This yellow and black bumble bee is distributed throughout western North America and is the most common bumble bee of California. These bees live in organized groups, with a queen, drones and workers. The queen first appears during spring and establishes underground colonies. After laying her first brood she and the workers will incubate the cluster until the adults emerge. Late in the season, males and young queens leave the nest and mate while the old males, queens and workers die. The new queen stays in the area and the next spring the cycle continues.

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  • yerba_mansa_anemopsis_californica
    Yerba Mansa Anemopsis californica
    yerba_mansa_anemopsis_californica

    Yerba Mansa | Anemopsis californica

    Pigment print on canvas | 16" x 20" | Photograph by Susan Gottlieb

    The bizarre “lizard tail” is a member of an ancient group of flowering plants that includes black pepper, as recalled by the peppery scent of its crushed leaves. Essentially a wetland species that tolerates a broad degree of alkali conditions, Yerba Mansa may be found most commonly at desert oases and in a few remaining freshwater and brackish wetlands on the coastal slope. It does surprisingly well in gardens, planted around ponds. It continues to be widely used by Native Americans to reduce swelling and to treat other conditions.

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